New Dr. Gerald Horne: The Brilliant Historian which most Black men have never heard of!



Gerald Horne (born January 3, 1949) is an American historian who currently holds the John J. and Rebecca Moores Chair of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston.

Gerald Horne was raised in St. Louis, Missouri. After undergraduate education at Princeton University he received his Ph.D. from Columbia University and a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Father of Flora Horne.

Horne holds the John J. and Rebecca Moores Chair of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston. Horne is a frequent contributor to Political Affairs magazine.[1]

Horne has published on W. E. B. Du Bois and has written books on neglected but by no means marginal or minor episodes of world history. He writes about topics he perceives as misrepresented struggles for justice, in particular communist struggles and struggles against imperialism, colonialism, fascism, racism and white supremacy. A Marxist, individuals whose lives his work has highlighted in their historical contexts have included the blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter John Howard Lawson, Ferdinand Smith (a Jamaican-born communist, sailor, labor leader, and co-founder of the National Maritime Union), and Lawrence Dennis, an African American fascist and racist who passed for white.

While many of Horne’s books use a celebrated, intriguing or politically engaged individual as a prism to inspect the historical forces of their times, Horne has also produced broad canvas chronicles of infrequently examined periods and aspects of the history of white supremacy and imperialism such as the post-civil war involvement of the US ruling class—newly dispossessed of human chattels—with slavery in Brazil, which was not legally abolished until 1888, or the attempts by Japanese imperialists in the mid-20th century to appear as the leaders of a global war against white supremacy, thus allies and instruments of “liberation” for people of color oppressed by imperialism.

Manning Marable has said: “Gerald Horne is one of the most gifted and insightful historians on racial matters of his generation.”[2]

References:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Horne

9:27 https://youtu.be/C71DIrOmkBM

List of Slave Revolts ​https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stono

https://youtu.be/Py6n9CTLoGI

https://youtu.be/v1Y-u4RtSGI

https://youtu.be/6A2TvKgXMTY

6:00 https://youtu.be/9iVmED7guHQ

https://youtu.be/WEyl74AlEKQ

source

Check Also

New VECHAIN MET €1000 UITBREIDEN IN MIJN CRYPTO PORTFOLIO

💎 Coinmerce account aanmaken: https://coinmerce.io/r/hJGSlHtuQS 💎 DEGIRO (AANBEVOLEN): https://bit.ly/3oJggHf 💎 Gratis aandeel BUX: https://bit.ly/2TZA7Gt 💎 …

12 comments

  1. Great stuff

  2. Profound lecture… This confirms things I've always sensed. Our history is rich and untold. To a great degree, I find that white Americans are completely uniformed about their cultural heritage also and live unexamined lives without a rooted understanding of why they do/value things.This helps explain things because our history in this country is linked irreversibly.

  3. History repeating itself as we speak.

  4. I know this guy personally as i am from STL and grew up in the foster care system. I saw the name and knew it from my childhood and the face looked very very familiar. So i looked him up… Ah ha i knew i knew him.

  5. MARCO powell

    Mr spurling I think you should invite Omowale africa along with Geraldo Horne to get a world rounded perspective why don't you observe how the Europeans created an empire for themselves in northamerica by creating their identity as whites wich unified them irregardless of tribe weather Irish Scottish French instead you hold on to words invented by a very hateful woman in the service of white nationalist ADOS/FBA as black people in America we need our own identity not base on Tribalism and hate but what we have in common as black people Tribalism is the reason why we got enslaved in the first place there was no african or black identity in the 15 16 17 18 19th century Europeans and Arabs played one tribe against another there was no them against us no one tribe sold is own people it was raids conflic from different tribes the modern african countries didn't exist then so who is going to pay who? We still haven't learn the lesson of Tribalism in Africa or in the America's because that's what ADOS/FBA is remember a divided house can't never stand whites have learned that lesson well so Mr spurling you need to have a open mind

  6. Just commenting for the algorithm.

  7. Joseph Jones

    Thanks you, Mr. Dennis!

  8. For the algorithm

  9. Trucker Dude

    Eye opening! 🎯

  10. The more i lean of our true history the more i know that we have to leave and start over somewhere else. A place of our own…..

  11. Tarharqa Ta Seti

    My mother's family are from St Lucia and believe it or not, Lucians got their freedom from 1795. My ancestors fought collectively and won against the British. The Brits took prisoners from St Lucia, St Vincent and Martinique and sailed them back to England, I believe they were imprisoned in Cornwall. The conditions were horrendous and many men perished, due to the crappy food and lack of appropriate clothing, they eventually got blankets and that saved the remaining men. Eventually they were freed and shipped back to the Islands, (the locals petitioned the authorities). Perhaps you can cover this untold important story of the Caribbean. Thanks Uncle D.

  12. Brandon Baldwin

    1111. Truckergang learning from you everyday like I’m back in college 💪🏾 (college dropout)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *